The Lazarus Project


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On 14.11.2019
Last modified:14.11.2019

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The Lazarus Project

Der Ex-Kriminelle Ben Garvey ist glücklich: Er hat eine schöne Frau, eine wunderbare Tochter und ein geregeltes Einkommen. Kurz nach Ende seiner. The Lazarus Project, ProSieben. kopieren. Infobox. Von bis - Sonntag, Thriller. USA Ab 12 Jahren. Seine Bewährungszeit fast hinter sich gebracht, kann Ben gar nicht glauben, wie viel Glück er hat. Als er unerwartet seinen Job verliert, gerät er wieder auf die.

The Lazarus Project Videos zu Paul Walker

Seine Bewährungszeit fast hinter sich gebracht, kann Ben gar nicht glauben, wie viel Glück er hat. Als er unerwartet seinen Job verliert, gerät er wieder auf die schiefe Bahn. Ein Überfall endet tödlich und Ben selbst wird zum Tode verurteilt. Deutscher Titel, Das Lazarus-Projekt. Originaltitel, The Lazarus Project. Produktionsland, USA. Originalsprache, Englisch. Erscheinungsjahr, Länge, The Lazarus Effect ist ein US-amerikanischer Science-Fiction-Thriller von David Gelb aus dem Jahr mit Mark Duplass, Olivia Wilde, Donald Glover, Evan. oodesign.eu - Kaufen Sie Das Lazarus Projekt günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden zu einem attraktiven Preis. Amazon's Choice für "lazarus project". Der Ex-Kriminelle Ben Garvey ist glücklich: Er hat eine schöne Frau, eine wunderbare Tochter und ein geregeltes Einkommen. Kurz nach Ende seiner. Seine Bewährungszeit fast hinter sich gebracht, kann Ben gar nicht glauben, wie viel Glück er hat. Als er unerwartet seinen Job verliert, gerät er wieder auf die. A harrowing and frightening thriller about a man who has everything he's ever loved stripped away from him; and to earn his life and family back, he must face.

The Lazarus Project

The Lazarus Effect ist ein US-amerikanischer Science-Fiction-Thriller von David Gelb aus dem Jahr mit Mark Duplass, Olivia Wilde, Donald Glover, Evan. The Lazarus Project, ProSieben. kopieren. Infobox. Von bis - Sonntag, Thriller. USA Ab 12 Jahren. 2,58 Millionen Bewertungen. Herunterladen. Kerwe, Promis, Flims, Ruhe In Frieden Paul Walker, People Magazine, Fast. Mehr dazu. Paul The Lazarus Project. The Lazarus Project

When he meets an old friend from Sarajevo, a photographer called Rora who did stay in Sarajevo during the war, Brik goes with him on a fact-finding journey to trace the family and life of Lazarus.

Brik begins in Lviv, Ukraine, near where Brik's paternal grandfather lived in a small village. Brik is not very focused on his investigation of Lazarus, but instead wanders about Eastern Europe for the rest of the book.

He is clearly still internally lost, especially as he sees Sarajevo and eventually Moldavia is run down, everything changed, and many stories, especially those of his friend Rora about his wartime adventures, cannot be substantiated.

Brik is discovering only ghostly echoes and remains of a dead history. In trying to find a coherent past from the embellished fairy tales of war survivors, he finds nothing historically definite other than silent gravestones in a cemetery.

Why oh why do most Eastern European writers write of characters who are so morose without any insight, and why do they write only books which hint sideways at deep angsty moral uncertainties without much clarity or conclusions?

Hemon, the author, has a real history similar to his character Brik. The book must be somewhat autobiographical. The novel is incredibly stuffed with subtle well-done symbolism and double meanings.

But like in most Eastern European literary novels I've read, it seems to me anyway, the characters have no idea of what is wrong with them, but they are vaguely motivated to solve their inner unresolved pangs through the chasing of shadows which, inexplicably to them but not to readers, draw them like moths to a light.

Nothing ever resolves by the end of the book. At least the internal miseries still exist, and no enlightenment occurs for the main character.

He almost always a man is as mystified by his sense of failure and unresolved angst by the end of whatever story the author has concocted up.

These novels often are lauded and acclaimed by Western Europe and the Eastern Establishment elites of the United States. Awards are dully awarded.

The writing and construction of 'The Lazarus Project' is superb. If you are an admirer of literary prowess in the writing of oblique misery, I recommend this novel.

Personally, I am full of exasperation and wonder at the wtf literary culture, to me, in Eastern Europe and modern Russia also, to some degree, the wtf culture of literary Japanese writers who use ghosts and spirits for writing about their inner mysterious, to their protagonists, angsty sense of nothing really matters or can be known for eternity.

I am frustrated at these supremely literary and deep triple-layered symbolic books which leave protagonists and readers on deserted bleak islands of no rescue, no answers, no spiritual redemptions or self-discovery by the protagonists.

Cultures of overwhelming public social rigidity and conformity, and a knowledge of forbidden past history, which I think is or was common to Eastern Europe and Japan, and maybe all aristocratic upper elites and graduates of uppercrust University literary programs, seems to produce writers who write these subtle symbolic novels of quiet internal desperation which never resolve for the main protagonist.

Most of the other characters in these novels do not appear to be haunted at all by the end of the story, and only by the end of the story, but instead they pursue lives of surface and concrete interests which the main protagonist can never fathom.

These same types of novels also occur in literary England, and to a lesser degree, of elite Eastern coast literary types of America.

The writing of these kind of elite high-end literary novels mystify me as endlessly as the hapless, emotionally inept and depressed characters the books highlight are mystified by the people and events in their fictional lives.

Why are they written, why do they all follow this clear obvious definable pattern, and why do they consistently win awards from the literary Establishment?

They are a clue to the language of the 'self' of literary elites in the major Art centers of elite literary publishers and Art circles.

I keep trying to grok this elite literary Artist Mindset and the elite literary Establishment which loves these oblique and bleak quiet novels of unresolved and unspoken desperation of a main character.

I think all of these elite "I am a high-end literary Artist, too sensitive to live" guys of this type of novel need to go see the kind of psychologist which encourages frank and open conversations.

The tragedies and repressions of inner and outer personal social expressions caused by horrific historical events and governmental brutality are now openly written about and discussed.

I begin to respect the modern Irish writers a lot more who are openly revisiting the social horrors of their culture and history, and exposing the Ireland which was repressed dreadfully and horrifically by the Catholic Church.

Just saying, personal opinion. View all 6 comments. I've been wanting to read this book for a while because I have a thing about stories true and fictional involving historical anarchists.

There are multiple storylines here, one taking place in the early 20th century in Chicago after Lazarus is shot by the police chief, and accused of being an anarchist.

This storyline is told by his older sister, Olga, who tries to make sense of his death in a land that promised opportunity, unlike their homeland in Eastern Europe.

Another storyline is told fr I've been wanting to read this book for a while because I have a thing about stories true and fictional involving historical anarchists.

Another storyline is told from a present-day perspective when Brik, another Eastern European immigrant, becomes fascinated by Lazarus's story and works to find out the truth as to what really happened.

It's all a fine enough book. I had trouble making any real connection to anyone, though I would say, strangely, that Olga was the closest to having any real sense of personality or emotion.

In fact, the early 20th century storyline worked for me much better than the present-day stories. The stories are intertwined, but I feel the real strength worked in the historical fiction aspect.

I would have liked to see more of that, removing Brik and the modern-day timeline. I give this three stars because of the inclusion of Emma Goldman, aka Red Emma, one of my favorite anarchists from the early 20th century.

More could have been done with her character and her partner's, Ben Reitman. But I suppose I should be pleased with their presence at all since it would be difficult talking about Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe in the early 20th century in Chicago without mentioning them.

I'm not completely disappointed, but I did expect more from this. Probably because I don't fully grasp what is and is not postmodern because it's all a big secret apparently because I also don't get how The Scarlet Letter is postmodern, but it's on that list too, so In any case, glad to be able to mark this book off that list, even if it doesn't make sense to me why it's on the list in the first place.

Maybe we can discuss that at our book club meeting for which we read this book. View all 4 comments. Jan 18, Debbie rated it did not like it Recommends it for: NO.

Shelves: tossed. I really tried to like this book. The book has 2 main subjects -- Lazarus, a 19 year old immigrant shot in by a policeman in Chicago for unknown reasons and the story of the author that is struggling to write Lazarus's story.

While the Lazarus sections are very good and engaging, the struggling writer parts are not. Basically those chapters have this format: Mujo joke, Rora story, author lame I really tried to like this book.

Basically those chapters have this format: Mujo joke, Rora story, author laments that he is a loser and his wife is going to leave him -- over and over and over.

I feel cheated. It's as if the Hemon had writers block and wrote about it writing and the process of writing to beef up what was essentially a short story into a novel.

If I wanted to read about the tormented soul of the writer I'd read non fictional accounts of Edgar Allen Poe. View 1 comment.

Jun 05, Murtaza rated it really liked it. Very strange and entertaining novel. Hemon's writing is charismatic, self-deprecating and funny — enough so that it overcomes the lack of a coherent plot.

It is basically the story of a Bosnian-American's road trip through Eastern Europe, interspersed with the historical account of a murder of a Jewish immigrant that took place in Chicago one hundred years earlier.

It's not immediately clear what connects these two stories. I read it as an extended commentary on the pain, alienation and wild hop Very strange and entertaining novel.

I read it as an extended commentary on the pain, alienation and wild hope that accompanies immigration itself. To me this is an enjoyable subject for a novel.

I'll definitely be reading more of Hemon's work. While this novel lacked something in structure, it read so well that you can get through it in a few long sittings.

He is a fascinating writer. Sep 04, Jeremy Allan rated it liked it Shelves: modern-and-contemporary-fiction. I probably would have rated this book higher than three stars if I'd have come to it first among Hemon's work, but after having previously read his first two books, this one lacks some lustre.

Most of my problems with the book were related to where repetitive tropes from Hemon's other books seemed stale this time around. He often gets compared to Nabokov since his first language is not English though Nabakov's Speak, Memory makes that claim a little more problematic.

Both, as writers, share ob I probably would have rated this book higher than three stars if I'd have come to it first among Hemon's work, but after having previously read his first two books, this one lacks some lustre.

Both, as writers, share obsessions that can be at least partially attributed to their experiences as ex-patriots.

Hemon, however, seems to only have two real characters across three books, Josef Pronek and Aleksandar Hemon himself under various guises.

Both characters are Bosniak-Americans, thrust into life in Chicago after getting stranded there by the siege in Sarajevo.

It makes for intensely interesting material for the first two books, but gets old by the third. Luckily, in The Lazarus Project , research starts to play a role in bringing in new fictional elements.

I hope he pursues more of that angle in the future. Apr 15, Stefan rated it did not like it. With "The Lazarus Project," Aleksander Hemon establishes himself as a completely ignorable voice on the literary scene; a product of hype over substance; a lazy writer coasting on the unbelievable luck of winning a MacArthur grant, also known as a "genius grant.

The story certainly has possibilities. It simultaneously tells the story of a Jewish immigrant Lazarus murdered by a police chief in Chicago, and subsequently made out to With "The Lazarus Project," Aleksander Hemon establishes himself as a completely ignorable voice on the literary scene; a product of hype over substance; a lazy writer coasting on the unbelievable luck of winning a MacArthur grant, also known as a "genius grant.

It simultaneously tells the story of a Jewish immigrant Lazarus murdered by a police chief in Chicago, and subsequently made out to be an anarchist who was planning to assassinate the chief, and a Bosnian-born writer Brik living in Chicago who sets out to write a book about it.

Hemon happens to be a Bosnian-born writer living in Chicago. And the book's narrator, Brik, happens to have won a grant that allows him to undertake the Lazarus project.

It's obviously thinly veiled autobiography my guess is Hemon got tired of doing research on the real events surrounding Lazarus' murder and decided to write a novel about a writer researching Lazarus' murder.

But what really undercuts the book is that Hemon doesn't even bother to flesh out the character that's clearly based on himself. There is no indication of why Brik is interested in Lazarus' story.

He even mentions that the book, once written, will have no real impact on the world. So why is he bothering? Brik nevertheless runs into a childhood friend from Sarajevo, Rora, and the two go on a trip to Eastern Europe to research Lazarus' origins, coming to America after suffering a pogrom an anti-Jewish riot in Kishinev, then part of the Russian Empire.

Brik and Rora's trip is more a look at how a writer and his photographer friend waste grant money than it is an insight into early 20th Century Russia.

There are vague connections made between Brik and Lazarus, but they amount to nothing. Rora, a veteran of the war in Sarajevo during the mids, tells stories of his experiences.

And Brik deals with his dislocation as an immigrant, leaving his home country before the war and marrying an American woman who may never truly understand him and vice-versa.

All of this is littered haphazardly throughout the novel. Never mind context, background or even some kind of focal point for the narrative.

Where is this all going? Who are these people? We don't find out. Brik is such a detached narrator he witnesses and partakes in some shocking acts of violence, and then moves on as if they're nothing , we can't even infer much either.

We just have to assume what this novel is about. That's as lazy and half-baked as an analogy as the book itself. Again, it's not at all clear why he cares about this Lazarus project.

There's nothing in the text to suggest why it's meaningful to him or anyone else, though it certainly could have been. I say the following not to be dramatic and with no malice intended, but Hemon is a worthless hack and this book should not have been published.

I didn't hate it. There were flashes of there being something there, but not enough. Not enough to be published. Simple as that. If I was an editor or a friend or a member of a creative writing class reading this, I would say, you have some good stuff here but you need to flesh it out more.

You need to add context and develop the characters. You have a lot of work to do. At one point, late in the novel, Brik writes that Bosnia is home, "where my heart is.

That's what gets you a MacArthur grant these days? Blatant, sappy, meaningless cliche? This book, like most these days, clearly wasn't edited by an editor.

You wonder if the writer himself even gave it a second look after an initial draft. Or did he just rest on his laurels and wait for the sycophants at the New York Times and the National Book Awards to coronate him?

View all 5 comments. Jun 03, Leanna rated it really liked it. Almost a century later, fictional Vladimir Brik, an immigrant from Bosnia, decides to write a book about Lazarus.

They travel through Ukraine, Moldova, and Bulgaria before finally returning to Sarajevo. The chapters alternate between Brik and Averbuch, and each is accompanied with a black-and-white photograph.

In essence, the novel suggests he is killed because the chief recognizes him not only as an immigrant but a Jew whom he suspects of anarchy.

These actions appear outrageous to the contemporary reader. Yet, how different is early twentieth-century Chicago from early twenty-first century America?

The reality of this comparison is disturbing. The novel also raises the interesting question of what makes an American an American. At some point does he truly morph from one nationality—one culture—to another?

Does an immigrant ever truly feel American? Lazarus invites contemplation and introspection. At times, though, I was distracted from the novel by Hemon himself.

Hemon, like Brik, was visiting the U. Hemon, like Brik, is married to an American. Hemon, like Brik, received a grant to write his book.

Brik does not always have the most flattering view of his wife, his in-laws, marriage, and fatherhood. Hemon is not a native English speaker.

He makes some interesting vocabulary choices and seems overly-obsessed with Madonna, but in general Lazarus is beautifully written. I will definitely be reading more Hemon.

Feb 03, Drew rated it really liked it. What did I think? I thought it was pretty damn good. I have to confess, I had very low expectations.

It appealed to me because it was on the LA Times "61 Postmodern Reads" list, a list that is guilty of being really hit-or-miss and also using 'read' as a noun, which consistently irks me.

That, plus a couple of lukewarm reviews and a distressingly vague back-cover teaser, prevented me from reading it as soon as I otherwise might have.

But it's way less of a chore than all those things would lead y What did I think? But it's way less of a chore than all those things would lead you or had led me to believe.

Hemon gets compared to Nabokov in some of the blurbs on my copy, and while I don't think that comparison is particularly apt, there are a few understated little Nabokovian games and jokes in between all the more straightforward prose that takes up the bulk of the novel.

It seems pointless, until it resurfaces later in the novel when the narrator is describing the weather and refers to clouds and cloudettes.

That might seem pretty minor, and in a way it is, but it also contributes to an unusual effect: reading The Lazarus Project is like reading two books at once: there's the text, which is as I said frillless and businesslike, and tells the parallel stories of Brik and Lazarus, two immigrants of different backgrounds but who share some important characteristics.

Yet there's also what lies underneath that story, a dreamlike, impressionistic fugue that traffics in connotations and web-thin connections.

This seems mostly to be done by the clever repetition exactly twice in the novel of a word or phrase like clouds and cloudettes , one that's insignificant enough to fly mostly under the radar the first time you read it, but the second time makes you wonder "did I read that in this book?

One quote, although it isn't exactly representative: one character is telling a joke to another Mujo left Sarajevo and went to America, to Chicago.

He wrote regularly to Suljo, trying to convince him to come, but Suljo did not want to, reluctant to leave his friends and his kafana.

Finally, after a few years, Mujo convinces him and Suljo flies over the ocean and Mujo waits for him at the airport with a huge Cadillac.

They drive downtown from the airport and Mujo says, See that building, a hundred stories high? I see it, Suljo says. Well, that's my building.

Nice, Suljo says. And see that bank at the bottom floor? I see it. That's my bank. And see that silver Rolls-Royce parked in front?

That's my Rolls-Royce. Congratulations, Suljo says. You've done well for yourself. They drive to the suburbs and Mujo points at the house, as big and white as a hospital.

See that house? That's my house, Mujo says. And see the pool, Olympic size, by the house? That's my pool.

There is a gorgeous, curvaceous woman sunbathing by the pool, and there are three healthy children happily swimming in it.

See that woman? That's my wife. And those children are my children. Very nice, Suljo says. But who is that brawny, suntanned young man massaging your wife?

Well, Mujo says, that's me. A little heavy-handed, maybe, but damned if that isn't the best symbolic encapsulation of the immigrant experience in America that I've seen in some time.

Sometimes the American dream can only be a dream. View 2 comments. Oct 24, David rated it it was amazing. I am not sure the average American reader can really understand this book.

It captures so well the thoughts of someone who drifts in this world without a home, not because he does not have access to such a place, but because his past shapes him so much he can no longer accept the concept of home others offer him.

The book is not perfect by any means. Some reviewers see it as an immigrant I am not sure the average American reader can really understand this book.

Some reviewers see it as an immigrant story, but that is a very myopic and generally American view. This story is about connections and the struggle to hold onto the un certainty when people come from drastically different places, both physically and psychologically.

It is about loneliness. Rabih Alameddine's favorite Chekhov quote: "If you are afraid of loneliness, don't marry. Nothing ever goes away, everything stays inside it.

It is a different reality. Aug 20, Nathan Rostron rated it really liked it. Hemon is not a rock star writer and garnered only polite applause.

Unlike Diaz in Oscar Wao, at any rate , Hemon's writing is not flashy or stylistically strutting somewhat awkwardly to allow for humongous cojones.

Born in Sarajevo, Hemon writes with a syncopated English-language sensibility; it seems quiet but then it will sneak up on you and knock you flat.

This one's definitely worth reading--my only complaint is that after the stunning first 40 pages the story plateaued and remained consistently interesting and well written and good, rather than continuing to ramp up into the stratosphere.

Dec 15, robin friedman rated it really liked it. The first story is set in Chicago of and is based upon a historical event.

The police department attempts to cover-up the circumstances of the murder by claiming Averbuch was an anarchist. The story explores the murder and its aftermath, centering on Averbuch's burial.

The novel further describes how Averbuch was a victim of an infamous Pogrom and came to the United States where has dreams of freedom and a new life were dashed.

Averbuch's murder occurs at the outset of the novel. Thus the focus of the story is on his older sister Olga who is inconsolable upon her brother's death.

As her story develops, it bears resemblances to Sophocles' play Antigone. Olga grieves because her brother has not been buried with the rites and rituals of Jewish law.

As in Sopocles' play, Olga faces tension between the requirements of a religious burial and what she comes to realize she must do in order to live and find a modicum of peace.

She is pitted against not only the City of Chicago but also by the more established and settled elements of the Chicago Jewish community.

The characters of Olga and Lazarus are poignantly developed. In addition, the story shows a great deal of Lazarus' and Olga's friend Isadore and of Olga's efforts to protect him from the Chicago police.

The portrayal in the book is of a Chicago which is rough and tumble and corrupt. Growing and welcoming of immigrants, the city also fears them.

In particular, the city and many people fear the anarchist movement led by Emma Goldman. The story develops against the background of this paranoia.

The immigrant experience does not end well here for Lazarus and his sister. The second story involves a contemporary Bosnian immigrant, Vladimir Brik.

He came to Chicago just prior to the Bosnian war. He lives a rather footlose life, selling stories and articles to newspapers and teaching English as a second language.

He is married to an American neurosurgeon, Mary, and feels guilty that he depends on Mary for financial support.

The book makes a great deal of the tension in this marriage between a marginally employed immigrant and a highly educated, successful American.

Brik becomes interested in the story of Lazarus Averbuch and wants to write a novel about him. He learns all he can find about the incident and then secures a grant to travel to his former home, Bosnia, and to Lazarus' home to see what he can learn about Lazarus' early life.

He travels with an old friend from Bosnia. The reader learns to story of Lazarus through the eyes and research of Brik. The book also shows a great deal of Brik's own story, including his feelings of loneliness, the difficulties of his life in the United States, and the problems in his relationship with his wife.

The book explores Bosnia in the aftermath of the war, and makes a great deal of Brik's reflections upon and changing attitudes towards the land of his birth.

In the portions of this book that deal with Lazarus Averbuch and his sister, Hemon has captured a great deal of the rawness of early Chicago and of the eastern Europe ghetto from which Averbuch fled.

The narrator's story generally is well told but less convincing. Much of the book explores the different attitudes towards life between Brik and Rora.

The photographer tends to be taciturn and matter of fact. Yet he is full of stories and snappy one-lines. The narrator is a more complex, reflective, moody individual.

The stories of Rora's activities during the Bosnian War are muddled, probably deliberately so. As the stories develop, a great deal of parallelism develops between Brik and Lazarus in terms of their reasons for leaving the land of their birth and their reactions to the United States.

Possibly the parallels are too neatly done. I came to understand and sympathize with Lazarus far more than with Brik.

The parallelism and interrelationship of the two stories sometimes is distracting. And the story is weakened in many places by the vacuous "metaphysical" reflections of the narrator, on large questions of life, death, and the nature of human happiness.

For the most part novels succeed on these themes when they illustrate them in the characters and activities of their protagonists. At its best, Hemon's book does this.

On occasion, the philosophizing was empty and forced. On the whole, this is a good novel which captures life in a large, ungovernable early 20th Century American city.

It shows the perils of immigrant life and the tragedies that befell some people who came to our shores in search of freedom. Readers interested in the vast literature by American immigrants may enjoy the recent anthology,"Becoming Americans: Four Centuries of Immigrant Writing" edited by Ilan Slavans in the Library of America.

Robin Friedman Mar 20, Maya Lang rated it liked it. Aleksandar Hemon is a brilliant, heady writer: dry wit, intellectual chops, existential searching, preoccupied with questions of displacement, belonging, home, and exile.

This "novel" it is not a novel is disappointing precisely because its author is so talented. The disappointment is worse somehow against the specter of what might have been.

A bowl of cereal i Aleksandar Hemon is a brilliant, heady writer: dry wit, intellectual chops, existential searching, preoccupied with questions of displacement, belonging, home, and exile.

A bowl of cereal is preferable to a gourmet meal that falls flat. Its opening sections are its strongest. The true story of Lazarus Averbuch is compelling; the thinly veiled story of an author's quest to document Averbunch's tale is also equally compelling.

From there, things grow mired. The story suffers from a failure to launch. It is a car trying to get out of the mud. Those initial sections are the first jolt of the accelerator, hopeful and promising, before the disappointing slide back into the muck.

The sections become redundant and strangely formulaic: a Mujo joke followed by an aphorism on the meaning of home followed by terse conversation with Rora, usually while in transit, followed by a rumination on a failing marriage.

There are no surprises. Worse, the writing often feels detached. To go back to my restaurant metaphor, the result is a tasting menu where the ingredients don't change: "Wait, didn't we already have this course?

He doesn't. His memoir, "The Book of My Lives," is more powerful. The references to his own life, what he is trying to convey here, are more potently delivered in essay form.

Perhaps that's it, then. Hemon is a writer—this is obvious—but perhaps not a novelist. Sometimes the turn to fiction gives an author freedom, but here it causes him to be evasive.

Essays are where Hemon shines because there is no place to hide. Nov 01, Josh added it Shelves: abandoned. I got halfway, but this one is being put away for good.

Mar 13, Cameron rated it did not like it. I often think that many critics give the book or movie, in many more familiar cases a good review because it is something they are supposed to do.

You don't want to be known as the critic who turned his nose up at the Latvian drama about a gay, existentialist teen trying to survive the drab, grim reality of life in a post-communist regime, would you?

What about the Paraguayan masterpiece about the girl that left that life of street gangs to become a school teacher that was later murdered by st I often think that many critics give the book or movie, in many more familiar cases a good review because it is something they are supposed to do.

What about the Paraguayan masterpiece about the girl that left that life of street gangs to become a school teacher that was later murdered by street gangs.

Well, you better give it a review, praising it for its "honesty" and "integrity". If all else fails, try to pigeon-hole it into a category that will make it seem like you totally got it on a different level than everyone else.

In my experience, The Lazarus Project is just such a book. It had to be good. So many people were saying such good things.

It was nominated for a National Book Award, and they don't just hand those things out to any old James Patterson. With excitement, I started reading, and reading, and reading and before I knew it, I was in the Chariots of Fire of novels and I wanted to get out as soon as possible.

The idea for a decent book is there—a Bosnian man discovers his own identity while researching the historical account of an immigrant murdered by a police sergeant in Chicago.

Yet, so many elements are missing that there is little left to bring it all cohesively together. It weaves in and out of the two stories; the first being an over-fictionalized and over-dramatized retelling of the after-effects of the immigrant's murder and the second being the on-the-road story of the writer aimlessly winding his way through Eastern Europe.

Story A is poorly told to the point of being very uninteresting. Story B is told in a stream-of-consciousness style that comes off as smug and utterly confusing when it comes to advancing the plot.

There is so much about this book that is not true from the reviews. It isn't a "tour-de-force" as I read in one review.

It also isn't, as I read in another, "a page-turner" unless you are turning the pages without reading them just to see how many more pages you have left to get through.

It is not a comedy as one review ridiculously put it. Sure, some characters tell jokes to each other. But they are jokes that are constructed in an Eastern-European mindset, and something that makes no sense to someone who hasn't had to stand in a breadline.

There is no comedy in this, however "wryly-drawn" as one review said. It could have used a better editor. It could have used a better plot.

It also could have used some more honest reviews. Title: The Lazarus Project A harrowing and frightening thriller about a man who has everything he's ever loved stripped away from him; and to earn his life and family back, he must face obstacles of mystical origins, endure countless tests of his faith, struggle with his own sanity, and explore the depth and the power of his soul..

Just finished watching this and I must say i am glad i saw it Many viewers have commented that the movie is very slow paced, esp to start with but i disagree.

I think the director got the pacing spot on. The movie is about an ex-con played by Paul walker who is trying to start a new life and make it good for himself and his family but fate has other plans and he is pushed back into the world he is so badly trying to escape All the actors do justice to their roles and the screenplay is tight and gripping Looking for something to watch?

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Edit Cast Cast overview, first billed only: Paul Walker Ben Garvey Piper Perabo Lisa Garvey Brooklynn Proulx Father Ezra Lambert Wilson

The Lazarus Project The Lazarus Project im Fernsehen - TV Programm: Mysterythriller. Ein Hingerichteter überlebt. Oder doch nicht? 2,58 Millionen Bewertungen. Herunterladen. Kerwe, Promis, Flims, Ruhe In Frieden Paul Walker, People Magazine, Fast. Mehr dazu. Paul The Lazarus Project. The Lazarus Project, ProSieben. kopieren. Infobox. Von bis - Sonntag, Thriller. USA Ab 12 Jahren. Seine Bewährungszeit fast hinter sich gebracht, kann Ben gar nicht glauben, wie viel Glück er hat und erkennt, dass er dankbar sein sollte für seine schöne Frau. Seine Pokemon Genesect als Einbrecher ermöglichen ihm, die Wahrheit im Büro des Anstaltsleiters zu finden. Ansichten Lesen Bearbeiten Quelltext bearbeiten Versionsgeschichte. 6 Years Stream Deutsch Killer in mir. Parasite Selten wurde eine Oscar-Verleihung so stark von einer ausländischen Produktion dominiert wie die Anfang Februar über die Bühne gegan Als er unerwartet seinen Job verliert, gerät er wieder auf die schiefe Bahn und dreht ein Ding - mit fatalen Folgen. Studio: Mandeville Films, Inferno Distribution. Mit ihren neu erwachten Fähigkeiten übernimmt sie die Macht in der gesamten Laborumgebung und schaltet den gesamten Frauenarzt In Hamburg und damit die Beleuchtung ab. Lionsgate sollte den Vertrieb des Films übernehmen. Luke DawsonJeremy Slater. Momentan Millers Crossing noch keine Besprechung vor. Premiere hatte Tahar Rahim Film in den Vereinigten Staaten am Namensräume Artikel Diskussion. Er entfernt das Implantat, Stephan Brüggenthies belastendes Material vom Computer und konfrontiert damit die beteiligten Ärzte und den Anstaltsleiter. Bloodshot Finden Pressevorführungen erst knapp vor dem Kinostarttermin statt - und sind Besprechungen dann auch noch mit einer Sperrfrist belegt, die Zoe beginnt auch ungewöhnliche psychische Fähigkeiten zu demonstrieren. Der Überfall geht tödlich aus und Ben selbst wird zum Tode verurteilt. Hauptseite Themenportale Zufälliger Artikel.

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How did you buy your ticket? View All Photos Movie Info. A death-row inmate Paul Walker searches for the truth after he mysteriously awakes in a psychiatric hospital.

John Glenn. Jul 26, Paul Walker Ben Garvey. Piper Perabo Lisa Garvey. Brooklynn Proulx Katie Garvey. Bob Gunton Father Ezra. Lambert Wilson Avery.

Linda Cardellini Julie Ingram. Tony Curran William Reeds. Malcolm Goodwin Robbie. Ross McMillan Dr. Aaron Hughes Caleb.

John Glenn Director. David Hoberman Producer. Todd Lieberman Producer. Matt Milich Producer. Travis Wright Producer. January 25, Rating: C- Full Review….

August 4, Rating: 1. May 1, Full Review…. November 15, Rating: 2. October 21, Full Review…. View All Critic Reviews 5.

Apr 06, If you saw Shutter Island then, in essence, you've seen this as well : hero investigates the staff at a remote psych facility for some unnamed malfeasance.

Walker holds this one down okay Kevin M. W Super Reviewer. Dec 03, Ok, well, I thought that this was a decent movie. Paul Walker did a great job, as did the entire cast.

Some people compare this to Shutter Island. Ok, I admit it was a similar premise, but I didn't like Shutter Island I DO, however, wish that they had ended this movie differently.

I was left with a little of that "now what" feeling. But, I didn't dislike the ending enough to take away from my rating. This was more of a drama, than a thriller, though.

Cynthia S Super Reviewer. Nov 13, Paul Walker plays a character sentenced to death - but wakes up after his lethal injections to a new world, or is it?

This was supposed to be a psychological thriller in which I thought did its part throughout the majority of the movie. Within the last half hour it starts to unravel to the point in which it's not technically a psychological thriller in my opinion at all but a dramatic film based on the morals of humanity; the choices and mistakes we all make as humans; and the response to correcting those who make those mistakes.

The correctional system is an interesting concept to me maybe because I am a student in Criminal Justice but noting the fact that our system jails individuals by the masses x the population of other countries and our crime rates while they've decreased since mass incarceration has started still doesn't reflect the lesser crime rates of countries who jail at slower rates - brings about questions of rehabilitation, our over population of prison inmates, and the inhumane responses we take to try to curb society for our own gratitude.

The American prison system despite the 12million individuals that circulate through it each year is one of the best kept secrets in the country hiding the conditions and inhumanity that goes on inside them from assaults, humiliation, rape, and the subject to deadly diseases that our Government fails to treat prior or take notice in before releasing them back into society on us.

While this all fact, and this movie itself as a response was fiction, the movie in my opinion was less about the story inside the movie and more about the future of our prison system that we all can either continue to ignore "Kill you?

But to the rest of the world, you're already dead" or humanity can wake up and understand even those on the inside deserve forgiveness and some sort of dignity.

I was an obvious fan of the thoughts it left you with, the awareness of what could happen without us ever even considering or knowing and what does happen not in this movie but other issues , and the greater morals behind the film.

The film itself was great and dark throughout it but the ending was slightly bland, a bit predictable, with questions on how that'd even be a possible scenario after what was supposed to have happened previously in the prison.

Will not say that as to not spoil the movie on here - but anyone else who has seen the movie should pick up on what I mean Pretty good film, but best for that in which it brought to mind and awareness off film.

Bobby H Super Reviewer. Aug 22, A very interesting story with great characters and plot line. It does copy Shutter Island a little though. It opens up discussion for how some released convicts are forced to reoffend simply because they can't get a job to get money any other way and also how ridiculous the American law system is for sentencing him to death for playing a part in the robbery.

He had nothing to do with the deaths. He didn't cause them per se, he was just part of a robbery. The only problem is that I felt they didn't really explain what the Lazarus Project actually was.

It felt like it came as an after thought. Sophie B Super Reviewer. This has all worked, to a greater or lesser degree, in the two story collections I've read, but The Lazarus Project , Hemon's first published novel, didn't work for me.

There are stories within stories within stories, often involving characters we barely know or don't know at all, except through the eyes of the characters telling the stories within stories within stories.

This is, I'm sure, the point. Life works that way, I can hear a grad-school type or perhaps Hemon himself telling me. Literature works that way -- and what are stories anyway?

What's fact? What's fiction? What's history? And so on. Questions like these are, for me at this stage, a pain in the ass.

They're sophomoric, unless the writer can find a way to enjoyably play with them, but Hemon's honorable but overly cautious sense of craft, of style, all but precludes that kind of play.

Reading this book was like being lost in a hall of mirrors, like opening a box that frustratingly contains another and so on. My similes are trite, aren't they?

I'm displaying my lack of sophistication. And you know what? I don't give a fuck. It's hot as hell, and I can still hear that fat kid tapping on his seat with drumsticks, all the way home from work.

I didn't, and don't, hate The Lazarus Project. Undeniably, there's value in it. There are many wonderful bits. But it's my prejudice that a good novel has to have breeziness, for want of a better term, interspersed with density, and this one doesn't.

Of course, the problem with a great many novels is that there's too much breeziness, but too much density can be a problem, too.

It's not a problem with short fiction -- density is the raison d'etre of short fiction -- but with a novel I need, or anyway want, to breathe every once in a while.

Yes, I'll climb another hill, Sarge, and I'll do it gladly if you let me take off this backpack and rest for a few minutes.

Got to keep going? Got to climb another hill? Well, okay. I knew when I signed up for the army this is what I was in for, but that doesn't mean I like it.

I think Hemon should stick with story collections, but I'm so burned out on him at the moment that I don't know that I'll ever get around to reading Nowhere Man , his third collection.

It's his second, chronologically. So that's what I think, but I'm not going to rate this book, or any other, with stars.

I never did believe in rating works of art with stars, or with thumbs up or thumbs down or any of the rest of that shit.

I did it reflexively in the past because I gathered that it was Goodreads protocol, but I think it's reductive. So there. I'm going to take a bath.

I'm going to take an aspirin. I'm not going to take a drink, even though I deserve one. Damn, it's hot.

View all 12 comments. Oct 14, Karen rated it liked it. Jeremy gave this book three stars and said that if he'd picked it up before reading Hemon's other stuff, he might have given it more.

I feel exactly the same way. This book certainly isn't bad, and I think Hemon has a lot of potential as a writer.

And it's a decent story, as a jumping off point - but after reading a bunch of his short stories, a couple of columns, his previous novel, and now this, I've lost interest.

And I get the feeling that he's lost interest, too, but doesn't know what to do about it. I mean, he got this grant to write about being from Bosnia, right?

He has to give the Guggenheims and the MacArthurs what they want! I hope that at some point Hemon stops trying to mold himself in the mediocre image that his adoring critics are imposing on him, and starts working on something that really interests him.

May 25, Ana rated it really liked it Shelves: me-likey-a-lot , about-murders , sex-drugs-rocknroll , law-abiding-citizen , page-turner , somehow-societal , a-little-historical , fallen-characters , of-life-and-death.

I really liked this. It's all over the place and written in a style that's pretty different from what you usually expect from a book about eastern Europe, jewish pogroms in Chisinau, the Bosnian genocide, human trafficking across the Romanian border and a character, Lazarus, that bizarely unites this all together.

Some of the passages are exquisitely written. As a Eastern-European myself, I can confirm to the absolute truth of some of the descriptions of slavic people and customs, they are beaut I really liked this.

As a Eastern-European myself, I can confirm to the absolute truth of some of the descriptions of slavic people and customs, they are beautifully captured.

Oct 16, aPriL does feral sometimes rated it liked it Shelves: literary , forgot-to-turn-on-the-oven , too-sensitive-to-live-cuz-im-artist , edgy-but-still-a-cozy , why-does-everyone-love-this-ick-ick , historical-fiction , existential-crisis-maid-quit , chattering-class-favorite.

Brik had been in America attending college when the war started a 'The Lazarus Project' by Aleksandar Hemon is a subtle book about loss of place. Brik had been in America attending college when the war started among the remnant territories of Yugoslavia.

I think because Brik feels an endless well of emptiness within, a sense of failure in not having been able to do something to help the people of Sarajevo during the Bosnian war, his home, he gloomily tries to resume a life of meaning as a refugee in America.

As this novel is literary, none of this is spelled out in words. He feels oddly guilty at having been safe in America while Bosnians suffered war deprivations and death.

He meets Mary, a neurosurgeon at Northwestern Hospital and they marry. While she cuts into the brain seeking the source of physical problems, Brik teaches an English-as-a-second-language class trying to overcome his feelings of inadequacy.

When he loses that job, Mary becomes the breadwinner. Brik has always wanted to write a book on an immigrant, Lazarus Averbuch, a Jewish refugee from a pogram in a Russian town, Kishinev, now a town in Moldavia.

Living in Chicago with his sister Olga, nineteen-year-old Lazarus has been attending meetings given by people the American establishment of consider anarchists.

Shippy thought Lazarus looked Jewish and foreign, so he thought Lazarus came to kill him and fired his gun immediately, no questions asked.

Chicago was very tense at the time, full of rumors about anarchist plots against Chicago leaders. The police painted Lazarus as an assassin.

He probably wasn't. Brik is obsessed with this story. When he meets an old friend from Sarajevo, a photographer called Rora who did stay in Sarajevo during the war, Brik goes with him on a fact-finding journey to trace the family and life of Lazarus.

Brik begins in Lviv, Ukraine, near where Brik's paternal grandfather lived in a small village. Brik is not very focused on his investigation of Lazarus, but instead wanders about Eastern Europe for the rest of the book.

He is clearly still internally lost, especially as he sees Sarajevo and eventually Moldavia is run down, everything changed, and many stories, especially those of his friend Rora about his wartime adventures, cannot be substantiated.

Brik is discovering only ghostly echoes and remains of a dead history. In trying to find a coherent past from the embellished fairy tales of war survivors, he finds nothing historically definite other than silent gravestones in a cemetery.

Why oh why do most Eastern European writers write of characters who are so morose without any insight, and why do they write only books which hint sideways at deep angsty moral uncertainties without much clarity or conclusions?

Hemon, the author, has a real history similar to his character Brik. The book must be somewhat autobiographical.

The novel is incredibly stuffed with subtle well-done symbolism and double meanings. But like in most Eastern European literary novels I've read, it seems to me anyway, the characters have no idea of what is wrong with them, but they are vaguely motivated to solve their inner unresolved pangs through the chasing of shadows which, inexplicably to them but not to readers, draw them like moths to a light.

Nothing ever resolves by the end of the book. At least the internal miseries still exist, and no enlightenment occurs for the main character.

He almost always a man is as mystified by his sense of failure and unresolved angst by the end of whatever story the author has concocted up.

These novels often are lauded and acclaimed by Western Europe and the Eastern Establishment elites of the United States. Awards are dully awarded.

The writing and construction of 'The Lazarus Project' is superb. If you are an admirer of literary prowess in the writing of oblique misery, I recommend this novel.

Personally, I am full of exasperation and wonder at the wtf literary culture, to me, in Eastern Europe and modern Russia also, to some degree, the wtf culture of literary Japanese writers who use ghosts and spirits for writing about their inner mysterious, to their protagonists, angsty sense of nothing really matters or can be known for eternity.

I am frustrated at these supremely literary and deep triple-layered symbolic books which leave protagonists and readers on deserted bleak islands of no rescue, no answers, no spiritual redemptions or self-discovery by the protagonists.

Cultures of overwhelming public social rigidity and conformity, and a knowledge of forbidden past history, which I think is or was common to Eastern Europe and Japan, and maybe all aristocratic upper elites and graduates of uppercrust University literary programs, seems to produce writers who write these subtle symbolic novels of quiet internal desperation which never resolve for the main protagonist.

Most of the other characters in these novels do not appear to be haunted at all by the end of the story, and only by the end of the story, but instead they pursue lives of surface and concrete interests which the main protagonist can never fathom.

These same types of novels also occur in literary England, and to a lesser degree, of elite Eastern coast literary types of America.

The writing of these kind of elite high-end literary novels mystify me as endlessly as the hapless, emotionally inept and depressed characters the books highlight are mystified by the people and events in their fictional lives.

Why are they written, why do they all follow this clear obvious definable pattern, and why do they consistently win awards from the literary Establishment?

They are a clue to the language of the 'self' of literary elites in the major Art centers of elite literary publishers and Art circles.

I keep trying to grok this elite literary Artist Mindset and the elite literary Establishment which loves these oblique and bleak quiet novels of unresolved and unspoken desperation of a main character.

I think all of these elite "I am a high-end literary Artist, too sensitive to live" guys of this type of novel need to go see the kind of psychologist which encourages frank and open conversations.

The tragedies and repressions of inner and outer personal social expressions caused by horrific historical events and governmental brutality are now openly written about and discussed.

I begin to respect the modern Irish writers a lot more who are openly revisiting the social horrors of their culture and history, and exposing the Ireland which was repressed dreadfully and horrifically by the Catholic Church.

Just saying, personal opinion. View all 6 comments. I've been wanting to read this book for a while because I have a thing about stories true and fictional involving historical anarchists.

There are multiple storylines here, one taking place in the early 20th century in Chicago after Lazarus is shot by the police chief, and accused of being an anarchist.

This storyline is told by his older sister, Olga, who tries to make sense of his death in a land that promised opportunity, unlike their homeland in Eastern Europe.

Another storyline is told fr I've been wanting to read this book for a while because I have a thing about stories true and fictional involving historical anarchists.

Another storyline is told from a present-day perspective when Brik, another Eastern European immigrant, becomes fascinated by Lazarus's story and works to find out the truth as to what really happened.

It's all a fine enough book. I had trouble making any real connection to anyone, though I would say, strangely, that Olga was the closest to having any real sense of personality or emotion.

In fact, the early 20th century storyline worked for me much better than the present-day stories. The stories are intertwined, but I feel the real strength worked in the historical fiction aspect.

I would have liked to see more of that, removing Brik and the modern-day timeline. I give this three stars because of the inclusion of Emma Goldman, aka Red Emma, one of my favorite anarchists from the early 20th century.

More could have been done with her character and her partner's, Ben Reitman. But I suppose I should be pleased with their presence at all since it would be difficult talking about Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe in the early 20th century in Chicago without mentioning them.

I'm not completely disappointed, but I did expect more from this. Probably because I don't fully grasp what is and is not postmodern because it's all a big secret apparently because I also don't get how The Scarlet Letter is postmodern, but it's on that list too, so In any case, glad to be able to mark this book off that list, even if it doesn't make sense to me why it's on the list in the first place.

Maybe we can discuss that at our book club meeting for which we read this book. View all 4 comments. Jan 18, Debbie rated it did not like it Recommends it for: NO.

Shelves: tossed. I really tried to like this book. The book has 2 main subjects -- Lazarus, a 19 year old immigrant shot in by a policeman in Chicago for unknown reasons and the story of the author that is struggling to write Lazarus's story.

While the Lazarus sections are very good and engaging, the struggling writer parts are not. Basically those chapters have this format: Mujo joke, Rora story, author lame I really tried to like this book.

Basically those chapters have this format: Mujo joke, Rora story, author laments that he is a loser and his wife is going to leave him -- over and over and over.

I feel cheated. It's as if the Hemon had writers block and wrote about it writing and the process of writing to beef up what was essentially a short story into a novel.

If I wanted to read about the tormented soul of the writer I'd read non fictional accounts of Edgar Allen Poe. View 1 comment. Jun 05, Murtaza rated it really liked it.

Very strange and entertaining novel. Hemon's writing is charismatic, self-deprecating and funny — enough so that it overcomes the lack of a coherent plot.

It is basically the story of a Bosnian-American's road trip through Eastern Europe, interspersed with the historical account of a murder of a Jewish immigrant that took place in Chicago one hundred years earlier.

It's not immediately clear what connects these two stories. I read it as an extended commentary on the pain, alienation and wild hop Very strange and entertaining novel.

I read it as an extended commentary on the pain, alienation and wild hope that accompanies immigration itself.

To me this is an enjoyable subject for a novel. I'll definitely be reading more of Hemon's work. While this novel lacked something in structure, it read so well that you can get through it in a few long sittings.

He is a fascinating writer. Sep 04, Jeremy Allan rated it liked it Shelves: modern-and-contemporary-fiction. I probably would have rated this book higher than three stars if I'd have come to it first among Hemon's work, but after having previously read his first two books, this one lacks some lustre.

Most of my problems with the book were related to where repetitive tropes from Hemon's other books seemed stale this time around.

He often gets compared to Nabokov since his first language is not English though Nabakov's Speak, Memory makes that claim a little more problematic.

Both, as writers, share ob I probably would have rated this book higher than three stars if I'd have come to it first among Hemon's work, but after having previously read his first two books, this one lacks some lustre.

Both, as writers, share obsessions that can be at least partially attributed to their experiences as ex-patriots.

Hemon, however, seems to only have two real characters across three books, Josef Pronek and Aleksandar Hemon himself under various guises.

Both characters are Bosniak-Americans, thrust into life in Chicago after getting stranded there by the siege in Sarajevo.

It makes for intensely interesting material for the first two books, but gets old by the third. Luckily, in The Lazarus Project , research starts to play a role in bringing in new fictional elements.

I hope he pursues more of that angle in the future. Apr 15, Stefan rated it did not like it. With "The Lazarus Project," Aleksander Hemon establishes himself as a completely ignorable voice on the literary scene; a product of hype over substance; a lazy writer coasting on the unbelievable luck of winning a MacArthur grant, also known as a "genius grant.

The story certainly has possibilities. It simultaneously tells the story of a Jewish immigrant Lazarus murdered by a police chief in Chicago, and subsequently made out to With "The Lazarus Project," Aleksander Hemon establishes himself as a completely ignorable voice on the literary scene; a product of hype over substance; a lazy writer coasting on the unbelievable luck of winning a MacArthur grant, also known as a "genius grant.

It simultaneously tells the story of a Jewish immigrant Lazarus murdered by a police chief in Chicago, and subsequently made out to be an anarchist who was planning to assassinate the chief, and a Bosnian-born writer Brik living in Chicago who sets out to write a book about it.

Hemon happens to be a Bosnian-born writer living in Chicago. And the book's narrator, Brik, happens to have won a grant that allows him to undertake the Lazarus project.

It's obviously thinly veiled autobiography my guess is Hemon got tired of doing research on the real events surrounding Lazarus' murder and decided to write a novel about a writer researching Lazarus' murder.

But what really undercuts the book is that Hemon doesn't even bother to flesh out the character that's clearly based on himself.

There is no indication of why Brik is interested in Lazarus' story. He even mentions that the book, once written, will have no real impact on the world.

So why is he bothering? Brik nevertheless runs into a childhood friend from Sarajevo, Rora, and the two go on a trip to Eastern Europe to research Lazarus' origins, coming to America after suffering a pogrom an anti-Jewish riot in Kishinev, then part of the Russian Empire.

Brik and Rora's trip is more a look at how a writer and his photographer friend waste grant money than it is an insight into early 20th Century Russia.

There are vague connections made between Brik and Lazarus, but they amount to nothing. Rora, a veteran of the war in Sarajevo during the mids, tells stories of his experiences.

And Brik deals with his dislocation as an immigrant, leaving his home country before the war and marrying an American woman who may never truly understand him and vice-versa.

All of this is littered haphazardly throughout the novel. Never mind context, background or even some kind of focal point for the narrative.

Where is this all going? Who are these people? We don't find out. Brik is such a detached narrator he witnesses and partakes in some shocking acts of violence, and then moves on as if they're nothing , we can't even infer much either.

We just have to assume what this novel is about. That's as lazy and half-baked as an analogy as the book itself. Again, it's not at all clear why he cares about this Lazarus project.

There's nothing in the text to suggest why it's meaningful to him or anyone else, though it certainly could have been.

I say the following not to be dramatic and with no malice intended, but Hemon is a worthless hack and this book should not have been published.

I didn't hate it. There were flashes of there being something there, but not enough. Not enough to be published. Simple as that. If I was an editor or a friend or a member of a creative writing class reading this, I would say, you have some good stuff here but you need to flesh it out more.

You need to add context and develop the characters. You have a lot of work to do. At one point, late in the novel, Brik writes that Bosnia is home, "where my heart is.

That's what gets you a MacArthur grant these days? Blatant, sappy, meaningless cliche? This book, like most these days, clearly wasn't edited by an editor.

You wonder if the writer himself even gave it a second look after an initial draft. Or did he just rest on his laurels and wait for the sycophants at the New York Times and the National Book Awards to coronate him?

View all 5 comments. Jun 03, Leanna rated it really liked it. Almost a century later, fictional Vladimir Brik, an immigrant from Bosnia, decides to write a book about Lazarus.

They travel through Ukraine, Moldova, and Bulgaria before finally returning to Sarajevo. The chapters alternate between Brik and Averbuch, and each is accompanied with a black-and-white photograph.

In essence, the novel suggests he is killed because the chief recognizes him not only as an immigrant but a Jew whom he suspects of anarchy.

These actions appear outrageous to the contemporary reader. Yet, how different is early twentieth-century Chicago from early twenty-first century America?

The reality of this comparison is disturbing. The novel also raises the interesting question of what makes an American an American.

At some point does he truly morph from one nationality—one culture—to another? Does an immigrant ever truly feel American?

Lazarus invites contemplation and introspection. At times, though, I was distracted from the novel by Hemon himself.

Hemon, like Brik, was visiting the U. Hemon, like Brik, is married to an American. Hemon, like Brik, received a grant to write his book.

Brik does not always have the most flattering view of his wife, his in-laws, marriage, and fatherhood. Hemon is not a native English speaker.

He makes some interesting vocabulary choices and seems overly-obsessed with Madonna, but in general Lazarus is beautifully written. I will definitely be reading more Hemon.

Feb 03, Drew rated it really liked it. What did I think? I thought it was pretty damn good. I have to confess, I had very low expectations.

It appealed to me because it was on the LA Times "61 Postmodern Reads" list, a list that is guilty of being really hit-or-miss and also using 'read' as a noun, which consistently irks me.

That, plus a couple of lukewarm reviews and a distressingly vague back-cover teaser, prevented me from reading it as soon as I otherwise might have.

But it's way less of a chore than all those things would lead y What did I think? But it's way less of a chore than all those things would lead you or had led me to believe.

Hemon gets compared to Nabokov in some of the blurbs on my copy, and while I don't think that comparison is particularly apt, there are a few understated little Nabokovian games and jokes in between all the more straightforward prose that takes up the bulk of the novel.

It seems pointless, until it resurfaces later in the novel when the narrator is describing the weather and refers to clouds and cloudettes. That might seem pretty minor, and in a way it is, but it also contributes to an unusual effect: reading The Lazarus Project is like reading two books at once: there's the text, which is as I said frillless and businesslike, and tells the parallel stories of Brik and Lazarus, two immigrants of different backgrounds but who share some important characteristics.

Yet there's also what lies underneath that story, a dreamlike, impressionistic fugue that traffics in connotations and web-thin connections.

This seems mostly to be done by the clever repetition exactly twice in the novel of a word or phrase like clouds and cloudettes , one that's insignificant enough to fly mostly under the radar the first time you read it, but the second time makes you wonder "did I read that in this book?

One quote, although it isn't exactly representative: one character is telling a joke to another Mujo left Sarajevo and went to America, to Chicago.

He wrote regularly to Suljo, trying to convince him to come, but Suljo did not want to, reluctant to leave his friends and his kafana.

Finally, after a few years, Mujo convinces him and Suljo flies over the ocean and Mujo waits for him at the airport with a huge Cadillac. They drive downtown from the airport and Mujo says, See that building, a hundred stories high?

I see it, Suljo says. Well, that's my building. Nice, Suljo says. And see that bank at the bottom floor? I see it.

That's my bank. And see that silver Rolls-Royce parked in front? That's my Rolls-Royce. Congratulations, Suljo says.

You've done well for yourself. They drive to the suburbs and Mujo points at the house, as big and white as a hospital.

See that house? That's my house, Mujo says. And see the pool, Olympic size, by the house? That's my pool.

There is a gorgeous, curvaceous woman sunbathing by the pool, and there are three healthy children happily swimming in it.

See that woman? That's my wife. And those children are my children. Very nice, Suljo says. But who is that brawny, suntanned young man massaging your wife?

Well, Mujo says, that's me. A little heavy-handed, maybe, but damned if that isn't the best symbolic encapsulation of the immigrant experience in America that I've seen in some time.

Sometimes the American dream can only be a dream. View 2 comments. Oct 24, David rated it it was amazing. I am not sure the average American reader can really understand this book.

It captures so well the thoughts of someone who drifts in this world without a home, not because he does not have access to such a place, but because his past shapes him so much he can no longer accept the concept of home others offer him.

The book is not perfect by any means. Some reviewers see it as an immigrant I am not sure the average American reader can really understand this book.

Some reviewers see it as an immigrant story, but that is a very myopic and generally American view. This story is about connections and the struggle to hold onto the un certainty when people come from drastically different places, both physically and psychologically.

It is about loneliness. Rabih Alameddine's favorite Chekhov quote: "If you are afraid of loneliness, don't marry. Nothing ever goes away, everything stays inside it.

It is a different reality. Aug 20, Nathan Rostron rated it really liked it. Hemon is not a rock star writer and garnered only polite applause.

Unlike Diaz in Oscar Wao, at any rate , Hemon's writing is not flashy or stylistically strutting somewhat awkwardly to allow for humongous cojones.

Born in Sarajevo, Hemon writes with a syncopated English-language sensibility; it seems quiet but then it will sneak up on you and knock you flat.

This one's definitely worth reading--my only complaint is that after the stunning first 40 pages the story plateaued and remained consistently interesting and well written and good, rather than continuing to ramp up into the stratosphere.

Dec 15, robin friedman rated it really liked it. The first story is set in Chicago of and is based upon a historical event. The police department attempts to cover-up the circumstances of the murder by claiming Averbuch was an anarchist.

The story explores the murder and its aftermath, centering on Averbuch's burial. The novel further describes how Averbuch was a victim of an infamous Pogrom and came to the United States where has dreams of freedom and a new life were dashed.

Averbuch's murder occurs at the outset of the novel. Thus the focus of the story is on his older sister Olga who is inconsolable upon her brother's death.

As her story develops, it bears resemblances to Sophocles' play Antigone. Olga grieves because her brother has not been buried with the rites and rituals of Jewish law.

As in Sopocles' play, Olga faces tension between the requirements of a religious burial and what she comes to realize she must do in order to live and find a modicum of peace.

She is pitted against not only the City of Chicago but also by the more established and settled elements of the Chicago Jewish community.

The characters of Olga and Lazarus are poignantly developed. In addition, the story shows a great deal of Lazarus' and Olga's friend Isadore and of Olga's efforts to protect him from the Chicago police.

The portrayal in the book is of a Chicago which is rough and tumble and corrupt. Growing and welcoming of immigrants, the city also fears them.

In particular, the city and many people fear the anarchist movement led by Emma Goldman. The story develops against the background of this paranoia. The immigrant experience does not end well here for Lazarus and his sister.

The second story involves a contemporary Bosnian immigrant, Vladimir Brik. He came to Chicago just prior to the Bosnian war.

He lives a rather footlose life, selling stories and articles to newspapers and teaching English as a second language.

He is married to an American neurosurgeon, Mary, and feels guilty that he depends on Mary for financial support. The book makes a great deal of the tension in this marriage between a marginally employed immigrant and a highly educated, successful American.

Brik becomes interested in the story of Lazarus Averbuch and wants to write a novel about him. He learns all he can find about the incident and then secures a grant to travel to his former home, Bosnia, and to Lazarus' home to see what he can learn about Lazarus' early life.

He travels with an old friend from Bosnia. The reader learns to story of Lazarus through the eyes and research of Brik.

The book also shows a great deal of Brik's own story, including his feelings of loneliness, the difficulties of his life in the United States, and the problems in his relationship with his wife.

The book explores Bosnia in the aftermath of the war, and makes a great deal of Brik's reflections upon and changing attitudes towards the land of his birth.

In the portions of this book that deal with Lazarus Averbuch and his sister, Hemon has captured a great deal of the rawness of early Chicago and of the eastern Europe ghetto from which Averbuch fled.

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